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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Engh, M J

(1933-    ) US librarian and author whose first sf novel, Arslan (1976; vt A Wind from Bukhara 1989), established a strong underground reputation in its first incarnation as a paperback original; a hardbound edition was released a decade later. Arslan, a young warlord from Near-Future Turkestan, has enigmatically conquered both the USA and the USSR. He personally occupies the small Illinois town of Kraftsville, mentally and physically seducing a teenage boy while at the same ...

Wheeler, Harriet

(1858-1924) US author whose The Woman in Stone (1903) presents elegiacally, though not without convinced Christian condescension, the declining culture of the Ojibwe nation of Native Americans through a tale in which the discovery of the petrified body of a woman from ancient times opens into the description of a doomed Lost Race. [JC]

Fontenelle, Bernard le Bovyer de

(1657-1757) French man of letters whose work pointed forward to the Age of Reason; nephew of the dramatist Pierre Corneille (1606-1684). He wrote much, and one of his most important books became a seminal influence on Proto SF: Entretiens sur la pluralité des mondes habités (1686; exp 1687; trans Sir W D Knight as A Discourse on the Plurality of Worlds 1687; new trans Aphra Behn as A Discovery of New Worlds 1688; new trans J Glanvill as The Plurality of Worlds 1688) [for further ...

Oliver, Jerome

(1886-?   ) US author of Khan, Phantom Emperor of 1940 (1934), a Near Future tale in which a threatened world conflagration, as plotted by the eponymous aspirant to world domination (see Yellow Peril), is averted. [JC]

Richter, Hans

Working name of German author Johannes Richter (1889-1941), whose early association with the Nazi regime in Germany has obliterated his reputation. His novel Der Kanal (1923) is derivative of Bernhard Kellermann's The Tunnel (1903) and describes a five-year construction project to build a canal between the North Sea and the Adriatic. The project is doomed, with great loss of life and the eventual insanity of the project manager. Turmstadt: Roman ["Turmstadt: A Novel"] (1926) reflects the ...

Robinson, Roger

(1943-    ) UK computer programmer, bibliographer and publisher, active in UK Fandom for many years. The Writings of Henry Kenneth Bulmer (1983 chap; rev 1984 chap) is an exhaustive Bibliography of one of the most prolific sf writers, and Who's Hugh?: An SF Reader's Guide to Pseudonyms (1987) is similarly exhaustive in its listing of Pseudonyms. Criticized at first for its failure to annotate its findings – so that, for instance, pseudonyms used for sf could not be ...



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