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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 20 June 2022
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Nizet, Marie

(1859-1922) Belgian author whose only novel, Le Capitaine Vampire (1879; trans Brian Stableford as Captain Vampire 2007), is a Vampire story set in Rumania and in some aspects prefiguring Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). The tale cycles through its crepuscular world in a manner reminiscent of Jan Potocki's The Manuscript Found at Saragossa (1804-1814), but is perhaps most notable for the savagery with which it depicts the horrors of War. After 1879, Nizet's writing career was destroyed by her ...

Dominican Republic

Among the Hispanic islands of the Caribbean basin, the Dominican Republic is perhaps the country that shows the smallest amount of sf production. Although Josefina de la Cruz's (?   -    ) Una casa en el espacio ["A House in Space"] (1986) could be considered the first sf work from the island, this cannot be accepted without controversy owing to its generic ambivalence, Equipoisal between sf (perhaps), Fantasy and religious discourse. Its originality is, in ...

McQuay, Mike

Working name of US author Michael Dennis McQuay (1949-1995), who began to publish sf with his first novel, Life-Keeper (1980), which very competently presents the kind of scenario he unrelentingly promulgated in book after book: a noir world governed by corrupt forces; a tough, anarchic, street-wise male protagonist whose powers – and virtue – are very exceptional indeed; and a plot which gives plenty of opportunities for arena-like conflicts between that protagonist and the corrupt ...

Liang Qichao

(1873-1929) Chinese historian, author and politician intimately involved with the reform movement of China's late imperial era. A proponent of constitutional monarchy rather than outright revolution, he was inspired by the work of Edward Bellamy and the Japanese author Tetchō Suehiro to frame his ideas in Xin Zhongguo Weilai ji ["An Account of New China's Future"] (1902 Xin Xiaoshuo) framed as a history lecture delivered by a descendant of the philosopher Confucius in the year 1962. / ...

Comets

Small, normally icy bodies of our solar system whose appearance during close approach to the Sun can be spectacular owing to heating and outgassing effects producing the coma (a visible local atmosphere surrounding the central nucleus) and long tail of dust and gas blown outward from the sun by the Solar Wind. Owing to this visibility and the regular return of short-period comets – whose home is in the Kuiper Belt beyond the orbit of Neptune (see Outer Planets) – comets have been ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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