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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Gandon, Yves

(1899-1975) French author. His Le dernier Blanc (1945; trans A M as The Last White Man 1948) depicts, on familiar lines, the chemical warfare of the future featuring a toxin deadly only to whites (see Race in SF). Other sf works include Après les hommes ["After Men"] (1963), involving an ethical ferromagnetic race in the Far Future, and La ville invisible ["The Invisible Town"] (1953). En pays singulier ["In a Remarkable Country"] (coll 1949) contains some sf. [JC/PN]

Killus, James P

(1950-2008) US chemist and author who began publishing work of genre interest with "Son of ETAOIN SHRDLU: More Adventures in Type and Space" for Asimov's with Sharon N Farber, Susanna Jacobson and Dave Stout in June 1981, publishing about twenty stories in all, most of them more ambitious than this initial vignette. His first novel, Book of Shadows (1983), is fantasy; his second, Sunsmoke (1985), undemandingly combines sf and fantasy in a story set in a fog-beset Los Angeles (see California), ...

Ross, Joseph

Working name of US editor Joseph Wrzos (1929-    ). He acted as Managing Editor of Amazing Stories and Fantastic 1965-1967 while continuing to teach high-school English full-time in New Jersey. He edited The Best of Amazing (anth 1967), selecting only stories before he became editor; and Hannes Bok: A Life in Illustration (graph coll 2012). His influence on the field has not been well publicized. He helped Sam Moskowitz with his book on Robert Duncan Milne and wrote an ...

House, Edward Mandell

(1858-1938) US political figure – in his refusal of official duties rather like an earlier Bernard Baruch (1870-1965) – involved with President Woodrow Wilson in setting up the League of Nations; his urgency about the USA's joining the League played some part in his dismissal in 1919 from Wilson's inner circle of advisors. Philip Dru, Administrator: A Story of Tomorrow, 1920-1935 (1912), published anonymously, is a surprisingly wide-ranging exercise in Politics. After a cartel of ...

Kneale, Nigel

(1922-2006) UK author and screenwriter, married to the well-known children's author Judith Kerr (1923-2019) from 1954 until his death; active from around 1944, very occasionally as by Nigel Neale. After attending the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and working as an actor, Kneale began writing short stories, twenty-six of which – some horror or fantasy – appear in Tomato Cain and Other Stories (coll 1949; rev 1950). Since then most of his writing work was for Television and film, ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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