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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 23 May 2022
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Morley, Henry

(1822-1894) UK author, biographer, editor, critic and academic who was professor of literature at University College, London, 1865-1889. He wrote for and contributed to Charles Dickens's Household Words and All the Year Round. Morley is perhaps best remembered as editor of two popular literature series, Morley's Universal Library (1883-1885) for George Routledge and Sons and Cassell's National Library (1886-1890) for Cassell. The former included two Omnibus volumes of Proto SF interest: ...

Doppelgangers

Literally, "double-walkers". Very broadly, doppelgangers begin to make significant appearances in the early nineteenth century, in the works of authors like E T A Hoffmann, whose use of these figures was central to the concept of the Uncanny (or Unheimlich) in the works of Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) (see also Mysterious Stranger). To meet one's own supernatural double (or Scots "fetch") was traditionally an unlucky or fatal portent; a well-known treatment of this theme is Edgar Allan Poe's short ...

Lindsay, Kathleen

(1903-1973) Extremely prolific author born in the UK but latterly of Somerset West, Cape Province, South Africa; she also lived in India, New Zealand, and Egypt, finally settling in South Africa in the late 1940s. In quantity and quality her output ranks with that of John Creasey and Lauran Paine; many of her supposed 904 books were routine romances or crime thrillers. Most of her sf appeared under the Pseudonym Nigel Mackenzie. One early sf title as by Lindsay is Unbroken Barriers (1940), in ...

Davenport, Benjamin Rush

(?   -?   ) US author, quite possibly a resident of Cleveland, Ohio, whose "Uncle Sam's" Cabins: A Story of American Life, Looking Forward a Century (1895) initially depicts a Near Future so biased toward capitalists that most Americans have become serfs; a Pandemic (see also Disaster) eventually gives a reformer the chance to create a more equitable Utopia. Davenport's best-known novel is the Future-War tale Anglo-Saxons, Onward! A Romance of the Future (1898), in ...

Dieudonné, Florence Carpenter

(1850-1927) US author. In her Rondah, or Thirty-Three Years in a Star (1887) the tale's several protagonists travel through the solar system in a mountain which, propelled by explosions, serves as a Spaceship that takes them to a large inhabited Asteroid, where the central figure of the tale becomes king of the native bird-people, who are in fact of vegetable origin, and who are replaced by ferocious elves when the worldlet cools down. Much happens. In the end, the protagonist, with his woman, ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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