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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Franklin, H Bruce

(1934-2024) US critic and academic, a cultural historian in various positions at Stanford University from 1961, in that year giving one of the earliest university courses in sf in the USA. In 1972, despite holding tenure, he was dismissed by Stanford for making speeches allegedly inciting students to riot against the university's involvement in the Vietnam War – a case well known to those interested in questions of academic freedom. He became full professor, again with tenure, at Rutgers ...

Woolf, A L

(?   -    ) UK author who wrote the novel Southern Exploration (1953) as by Adam Dale, a House Name of Curtis Warren, for which publisher Woolf also wrote non-sf under his own name. [SH/DRL]

Miller, Phyllis

(1920-2001) US librarian and author who collaborated with Andre Norton on three novels for children. Seven Spells to Sunday (1979) and House of Shadows (1984) are Fantasies, the former featuring travel to a magical Dimension and the latter being a supernatural thriller; Ride the Green Dragon (1985) is a nonfantastic tale of mystery and suspense. [DRL]

Chapin, Maud Hudnut

(1872-1963) US author of the stories, mostly sf, some very mildly Feminist in their implications, assembled as The Lost Star, and Other Stories (coll 1948 chap). [JC]

Zimlich, Jan

(?   -    ) US author whose first novel, Not Quite Paradise (1995), is a romantic sf tale set in rural America, where crashlanded Aliens establish First Contact with humans, an action which ends in Sex and other involvements. The complicated plotting in Heart's Play (1998) and The Black Rose (2000) encourage a sense that an underlying ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos ...



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