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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Allan, Mea

(1909-1982) Scottish journalist – she was best-known as war correspondent and columnist for the Daily Herald – and author in whose Near Future novel, Change of Heart (1943), World War Two has been won by the Allies, but peace is threatened by a resurgence of Nazism. [JC]

Montana, Ron

(1938-    ) US author whose published work in Fanzines included "We the People" in 1974 for Craig Strete's Red Planet Earth. His first sf novel, The Sign of the Thunderbird (1977), conveys its Post-Holocaust protagonists to the New Mexico of 1860, where their actions in espousing a free Indian Nation generate an Alternate-History vision of the USA. His second, The Cathedral Option (1978), a Near Future political thriller, is of less interest. Montana's engagement with Native ...

Côté, Denis

(1954-    ) Canadian author whose first two novels, marketed like their successors as juveniles, were Les Hockeyeurs cybernétiques (1983; trans lated by Jane Brierley as Shooting for the Stars 1990), a tale marked by a high degree of invention in its depiction of the adventures of the eponymous hockey player and a female journalist in Lost Ark, a Dystopia; further volumes in the Inactifs sequence include L'idole des inactifs ["A Star for the Idle Masses"] (1989), La ...

Philip, Alex

Working name of Alexander Philip (1882-1968) Scotland-born entrepreneur and author, in US with family from 1884 and in Canada from circa 1900. He is of sf interest for his Lost Race novel, The Painted Cliff (1927), set deep in a valley in the mountains of British Columbia where an ancient white civilization (Philip is condescending to Native Americans) is discovered. [JC]

Kennicott, Ada M

(1860-1926) US author of Under Red Pillars (1902), a Lost World tale couched as a retelling of European fairy tales, at least one episode taking place in a Hollow Earth venue. [JC]

Nicholls, Peter

(1939-2018) Australian editor and author, primarily a critic and historian of sf through his creation and editing of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction [see below]; resident in the UK 1970-1988, in Australia from 1988; worked as an academic in English literature (1962-1968, 1971-1977), scripted television documentaries, was a Harkness Fellow in Film-making (1968-1970) in the USA, worked as a publisher's editor (1982-1983), often broadcast film and book reviews on BBC Radio from 1974 and ...



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