Search SFE    Search EoF

  Omit cross-reference entries  

Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 21 May 2024
Sponsor of the day: The Telluride Institute
Logo

Franklin, H Bruce

(1934-2024) US critic and academic, a cultural historian in various positions at Stanford University from 1961, in that year giving one of the earliest university courses in sf in the USA. In 1972, despite holding tenure, he was dismissed by Stanford for making speeches allegedly inciting students to riot against the university's involvement in the Vietnam War – a case well known to those interested in questions of academic freedom. He became full professor, again with tenure, at Rutgers ...

Graham, Daniel, Jr

(?   -    ) US author whose Near Future sf novel, The Gatekeepers (1995), a private entrepreneur, frustrated by the left-leaning American government's refusal to occupy space proactively, sets up his own firm with his estranged wife's money, using modestly advanced Technology to create a weaponized private zone in near space in order to protect us (see ...

Holland, Clive

Pseudonym of UK author Charles James Hankinson (1866-1959) who began publishing stories in the Boys' Papers in the mid 1880s, and who is of genre interest for three novels: Raymi; Or, the Children of the Sun (1889), an eighteenth-century Lost World adventure involving pirates and the discovery of El Dorado in Peru; An Egyptian Coquette (1898; rev vt The Spell of Isis: A Romance of Egypt ...

London, Jack

Working name of US author John Griffith London (1876-1916), known primarily for his work outside the sf field. After leaving school at the age of 14, London spent seven years of adventure and hardship as an oyster pirate, sailor, hobo, prisoner and Klondike gold-seeker. During this period, he gave himself an education steeped in the most influential scientific and philosophic theories of the late nineteenth century – Darwinism (see Evolution; ...

Galactic Lens

This term, from Astronomy, makes frequent appearance in sf. It refers to the fact that our Galaxy is (like many others) approximately lens-shaped – it is a disc containing spiral arms, but like a lens it has a central bulge. Our own position in the Galaxy is quite a long way from the core; when we look towards the centre of the "lens", the direction in which the stars are clustered most thickly, we see the so-called Milky Way. Towards the outer rim of the ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. He began to publish work of genre interest with an sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" in Triquarterly for Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959]; he began consistently publishing sf reviews in his "New Fiction" column for the Toronto Star (1966-1967), and later in ...



x
This website uses cookies.  More information here. Accept Cookies