British Science Fiction Association Award

Tagged: Award

This Award developed from the original British Fantasy Award, which was sponsored by the British Science Fiction Association and initially made to a writer: John Brunner won the first in 1966. Following various organizational difficulties this was relaunched in 1970 as the British Science Fiction Association Award – usually known as the BSFA Award and sometimes termed the British Science Fiction Award – and thereafter was for a book.

For most of its lifetime the award has been voted on by BSFA members and members of the UK national Easter Convention, or Eastercon, although often not by very many of them; in some early years the adjudication was carried out by a small judging panel. The awards are normally announced at Eastercon. From 1979 the number of categories was increased to include short fiction, media and artist. In 1993, the media award was dropped. A nonfiction category was added for the 2002 awards, briefly renamed "Related Publication" for 2003 only, suspended in 2005, and reintroduced as a juried rather than voted category in 2006; in 2007, a "shortlist" of recommended nonfiction was released but no award presented. These modifications reportedly resulted from lack of voter interest and uncertainty about the category's scope, with book-length and shorter works competing unequally. In 2008, nominations were accepted but the category failed to appear on the final ballot owing to a general lack of consensus; this problem did not recur in subsequent years. The original intention was to honour notable individual essays and reviews, but voters have tended to prefer aggregations such as books, blogs or regular columns. As of 2008, collections of material previously published before the qualifying year are ineligible unless expanded or substantially revised.

The BSFA Award eligibility rules have occasionally changed; most early versions required UK authorship, but later only UK publication was required. The Best Artist award was normally given for a specific cover rather than for a body of work, and became officially Best Artwork in 1992. Special awards – chosen by BSFA committee members rather than a voting process – have been made five times, in 1974, 1976, 1977, 1994 and 1999 (see below). Because the award has not been well publicized and has a narrow voting base, it has never had the hoped-for effect of acting as a counterweight to the US-dominated Hugos and Nebulas. Although often named for the year in which works became eligible, the awards are listed below according to the year in which they were actually made (i.e., the following year). [PN/DRL]

Novel

This Award developed from the original British Fantasy Award, which was sponsored by the British Science Fiction Association and initially made to a writer: John Brunner won the first in 1966. Following various organizational difficulties this was relaunched in 1970 as the British Science Fiction Association Award – usually known as the BSFA Award and sometimes termed the British Science Fiction Award – and thereafter was for a book.

For most of its lifetime the award has been voted on by BSFA members and members of the UK national Easter Convention, or Eastercon, although often not by very many of them; in some early years the adjudication was carried out by a small judging panel. The awards are normally announced at Eastercon. From 1979 the number of categories was increased to include short fiction, media and artist. In 1993, the media award was dropped. A nonfiction category was added for the 2002 awards, briefly renamed "Related Publication" for 2003 only, suspended in 2005, and reintroduced as a juried rather than voted category in 2006; in 2007, a "shortlist" of recommended nonfiction was released but no award presented. These modifications reportedly resulted from lack of voter interest and uncertainty about the category's scope, with book-length and shorter works competing unequally. In 2008, nominations were accepted but the category failed to appear on the final ballot owing to a general lack of consensus; this problem did not recur in subsequent years. The original intention was to honour notable individual essays and reviews, but voters have tended to prefer aggregations such as books, blogs or regular columns. As of 2008, collections of material previously published before the qualifying year are ineligible unless expanded or substantially revised.

The BSFA Award eligibility rules have occasionally changed; most early versions required UK authorship, but later only UK publication was required. The Best Artist award was normally given for a specific cover rather than for a body of work, and became officially Best Artwork in 1992. Special awards – chosen by BSFA committee members rather than a voting process – have been made five times, in 1974, 1976, 1977, 1994 and 1999 (see below). Because the award has not been well publicized and has a narrow voting base, it has never had the hoped-for effect of acting as a counterweight to the US-dominated Hugos and Nebulas. Although often named for the year in which works became eligible, the awards are listed below according to the year in which they were actually made (i.e., the following year). [PN/DRL]

Novel

  • 1970: John Brunner, Stand on Zanzibar (1968)
  • 1971: John Brunner, The Jagged Orbit (1969)
  • 1972: Brian W Aldiss, The Moment of Eclipse (coll 1970)
  • 1973: No award (insufficient votes)
  • 1974: Arthur C Clarke, Rendezvous with Rama (1973)
  • 1975: Christopher Priest, Inverted World (1974)
  • 1976: Bob Shaw, Orbitsville (1975)
  • 1977: Michael G Coney, Brontomek! (1976)
  • 1978: Ian Watson, The Jonah Kit (1975)
  • 1979: Philip K Dick, A Scanner Darkly (1977)
  • 1980: J G Ballard, The Unlimited Dream Company (1979)
  • 1981: Gregory Benford, Timescape (1980)
  • 1982: Gene Wolfe, The Shadow of the Torturer (1980)
  • 1983: Brian W Aldiss, Helliconia Spring (1982)
  • 1984: John T Sladek, Tik-Tok (1983) UK
  • 1985: Robert P Holdstock, Mythago Wood (September 1981 F&SF; exp 1984)
  • 1986: Brian W Aldiss, Helliconia Winter (1985)
  • 1987: Bob Shaw, The Ragged Astronauts (1986)
  • 1988: Keith Roberts, Gráinne (1987)
  • 1989: Robert P Holdstock, Lavondyss (1988)
  • 1990: Terry Pratchett, Pyramids (1989)
  • 1991: Colin Greenland, Take Back Plenty (1990)
  • 1992: Dan Simmons, The Fall of Hyperion (1990)
  • 1993: Kim Stanley Robinson, Red Mars (1992)
  • 1994: Christopher Evans, Aztec Century (1993)
  • 1995: Iain M Banks, Feersum Endjinn (1994)
  • 1996: Stephen Baxter, The Time Ships (1995)
  • 1997: Iain M Banks, Excession (1996)
  • 1998: Mary Doria Russell, The Sparrow (1996)
  • 1999: Christopher Priest, The Extremes (1998)
  • 2000: Ken MacLeod, The Sky Road (1999)
  • 2001: Mary Gentle, Ash: A Secret History (2000)
  • 2002: Alastair Reynolds, Chasm City (2001)
  • 2003: Christopher Priest, The Separation (2002)
  • 2004: Jon Courtenay Grimwood, Felaheen (2003)
  • 2005: Ian McDonald, River of Gods (2004)
  • 2006: Geoff Ryman, Air (2004; rev 2005)
  • 2007: Jon Courtenay Grimwood, End of the World Blues (2006)
  • 2008: Ian McDonald, Brasyl (2007)
  • 2009: Ken MacLeod, The Night Sessions (2008)
  • 2010: China Miéville, The City & The City (2009)
  • 2011: Ian McDonald, The Dervish House (2010)
  • 2012: Christopher Priest, The Islanders (2011)
  • 2013: Adam Roberts, Jack Glass: A Golden Age Story (2012)
  • 2014: (tie) Ann Leckie, Ancillary Justice (2013) and Gareth L Powell, Ack-Ack Macaque (2013)
  • 2015: Ann Leckie, Ancillary Sword (2014)
  • 2016: Aliette de Bodard, The House of Shattered Wings (2015)
  • 2017: Dave Hutchinson, Europe in Winter (2016)
  • 2018: Nina Allan, The Rift (2017)

Short fiction

  • 1979: Collection: Harlan Ellison, Deathbird Stories: A Pantheon of Modern Gods (coll 1975)
  • 1980: Christopher Priest, "Palely Loitering" (January 1979 F&SF)
  • 1981: Thomas M Disch, "The Brave Little Toaster" (August 1980 F&SF)
  • 1982: Robert P Holdstock, "Mythago Wood" (September 1981 F&SF)
  • 1983: Keith Roberts, "Kitemaster" (Spring 1982 Interzone)
  • 1984: Malcolm Edwards, "After-Images" (Spring 1983 Interzone)
  • 1985: Geoff Ryman, "The Unconquered Country" (Spring 1984 Interzone)
  • 1986: David Langford, "Cube Root" (Spring 1985 Interzone)
  • 1987: Keith Roberts, "Kaeti and the Hangman" (in Kaeti & Company, coll 1986)
  • 1988: Geoff Ryman, "Love Sickness" (Summer-Autumn 1987 Interzone)
  • 1989: Bob Shaw, "Dark Night in Toyland" (November/December 1988 Interzone)
  • 1990: Lisa Tuttle, "In Translation" (in Zenith, anth 1989, ed David s Garnett)
  • 1991: Kim Newman, "The Original Dr Shade" (June 1990 Interzone)
  • 1992: Molly Brown, "Bad Timing" (December 1991 Interzone)
  • 1993: Ian McDonald, "Innocents" (in New Worlds 2, anth 1992, ed David S Garnett)
  • 1994: Robert Holdstock and Garry Kilworth, "The Ragthorn" (in A Whisper of Blood, anth 1991, ed Ellen Datlow; 1993 Interzone)
  • 1995: Paul Di Filippo, "The Double Felix" (September 1994 Interzone)
  • 1996: Brian Stableford, "The Hunger and Ecstasy of Vampires" (January-February 1995 Interzone)
  • 1997: Barrington J Bayley, "A Crab Must Try" (January 1996 Interzone)
  • 1998: Stephen Baxter, "War Birds" (December 1997 Interzone)
  • 1999: Gwyneth Jones, "La Cenerentola" (October 1998 Interzone)
  • 2000: Eric Brown, "Hunting the Slarque" (March 1999 Interzone)
  • 2001: Peter F Hamilton, "The Suspect Genome" (June 2000 Interzone)
  • 2002: Eric Brown, "The Children of Winter" (January 2001 Interzone)
  • 2003: Neil Gaiman, Coraline (2002)
  • 2004: Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean, The Wolves in the Walls (2003 chap)
  • 2005: Stephen Baxter, Mayflower II (2004 chap)
  • 2006: Kelly Link, "Magic for Beginners" (September 2005 F&SF)
  • 2007: Ian McDonald, "The Djinn's Wife" (July 2006 Asimov's)
  • 2008: Ken MacLeod, "Lighting Out" (in disLocations, anth 2007, ed Ian Whates)
  • 2009: Ted Chiang, "Exhalation" (in Eclipse 2, anth 2008, ed Jonathan Strahan)
  • 2010: Ian Watson and Roberto Quaglia for "The Beloved Time of Their Lives" (in The Beloved of My Beloved, coll 2009)
  • 2011: Aliette de Bodard, "The Shipmaker" (November/December 2010 Interzone)
  • 2012: Paul Cornell, "The Copenhagen Interpretation" (July 2011 Asimov's)
  • 2013: Ian Sales, Adrift on the Sea of Rains (2012 chap)
  • 2014: Nina Allan, Spin (2013 chap)
  • 2015: Ruth E J Booth, "The Honey Trap" (in La Femme, anth 2014, ed Ian Whates)
  • 2016: Aliette de Bodard, "Three Cups of Grief, by Starlight" (January 2015 Clarkesworld)
  • 2017: Jaine Fenn, "Liberty Bird" (in Now We Are Ten: Celebrating the First Ten Years of NewCon Press, anth 2016, ed Ian Whates)
  • 2018: Anne Charnock, The Enclave (2017 chap)

Artist/artwork

  • 1980: Jim Burns
  • 1981: Peter Jones
  • 1982: Bruce Pennington
  • 1983: Tim White
  • 1984: Bruce Pennington
  • 1985: Jim Burns
  • 1986: Jim Burns
  • 1987: Keith Roberts
  • 1988: Jim Burns
  • 1989: Alan Lee
  • 1990: Jim Burns
  • 1991: Ian Miller
  • 1992: Mark Harrison, cover for Interzone 48
  • 1993: Jim Burns, cover for Hearts, Hands and Voices by Ian McDonald
  • 1994: Jim Burns, cover for Red Dust (Gollancz) by Paul J McAuley
  • 1995: Jim Burns
  • 1996: Jim Burns, cover for Seasons of Plenty by Colin Greenland
  • 1997: Jim Burns, cover for Ancient Shores by Jack McDevitt
  • 1998: {SMS}, The Black Blood of the Dead: cover for Interzone 116
  • 1999: Jim Burns, Lord Prestimion: cover for Interzone 138
  • 2000: Jim Burns, cover for Darwinia by Robert Charles Wilson
  • 2001: Dominic Harman, Hideaway: cover for Interzone 157
  • 2002: Colin Odell, cover for Omegatropic by Stephen Baxter (coll 2001)
  • 2003: Dominic Harman, cover for Interzone 179
  • 2004: Colin Odell, cover for The True Knowledge of Ken MacLeod edited by Andrew M Butler and Farah Mendlesohn
  • 2005: Stephan Martinière, cover for Newton's Wake by Ken MacLeod
  • 2006: Pawel Lewandowski, cover for Interzone 200
  • 2007: Fangorn (see Chris Baker), Angelbot, cover for Time Pieces (anth 2006) edited by Ian Whates
  • 2008: Andy Bigwood, Cracked World, cover for disLocations (anth 2007) edited by Ian Whates
  • 2009: Andy Bigwood, cover for Subterfuge (anth 2008) edited by Ian Whates
  • 2010: Stephan Martinière, cover for 2009 Pyr edition of Desolation Road (1988) by Ian McDonald
  • 2011: Joey Hi-Fi, cover for 2010 Angry Robot edition of Zoo City (2010) by Lauren Beukes
  • 2012: Dominic Harman, cover for 2011 Solaris edition of The Noise Revealed (2011) by Ian Whates
  • 2013: blacksheep, cover for Jack Glass: A Golden Age Story (2012) by Adam Roberts
  • 2014: Joey Hi-fi, cover for Dream London (2013) by Tony Ballantyne
  • 2015: Tessa Farmer, sculpture "The Wasp Factory" (homaging Iain Banks)
  • 2016: Jim Burns, cover for Pelquin's Comet (2015) by Ian Whates
  • 2017: Sarah Anne Langton, cover for Central Station (fixup 2016) by Lavie Tidhar
  • 2018: (tie) Jim Burns, cover for The Ion Raider (2017) by Ian Whates; Victo Ngai, illustration for "Waiting on a Bright Moon" (12 July 2017 Tor.com) by JY Yang

Media

Nonfiction/related publication

  • 2002: Stephen Baxter, Omegatropic (coll 2001)
  • 2003: David Langford, introduction to Maps: The Uncollected John Sladek (coll 2002) by John Sladek
  • 2004: Farah Mendlesohn, "Reading Science Fiction": introduction to The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction (anth 2003), edited by Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn
  • 2005: Category suspended
  • 2006: Gary K Wolfe, Soundings: Reviews 1992-1996 (coll 2005)
  • 2007: Category suspended
  • 2008: No award (insufficient nomination consensus)
  • 2009: Farah Mendlesohn, Rhetorics of Fantasy (2008)
  • 2010: Nick {LOWE}, "Mutant Popcorn" (Interzone film column)
  • 2011: Paul Kincaid, "Blogging the Hugos: Decline" (14-17 July 2010 Big Other)
  • 2012: John Clute, David Langford, Peter Nicholls and Graham Sleight, editors, The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction: Third Edition (2011-current web)
  • 2013: Lavie Tidhar and other editors, The World SF Blog (see also World SF)
  • 2014: Jeff VanderMeer, Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction (2013)
  • 2015: Edward James, "Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers in the Great War" (fantastic-writers-and-the-great-war.com)
  • 2016: Adam Roberts, Rave and Let Die: The SF & Fantasy of 2014 (coll 2015)
  • 2017: Geoff Ryman, "100 African Writers of SFF" (6 July and 1 November 2016 Tor.com)
  • 2018: Paul Kincaid, Iain M Banks (2017)

Special award

  • 1974: Brian W Aldiss, Billion Year Spree (1973)
  • 1976: James Blish, posthumously
  • 1977: David A Kyle, A Pictorial History of Science Fiction (1976)
  • 1994: John Clute and Peter Nicholls, editors of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (1993)
  • 1999: David Pringle, Interzone

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