Welcome to the Third Edition of the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, edited by John Clute, David Langford, Peter Nicholls (emeritus) and Graham Sleight (managing). All 16,700+ entries are free online. A few sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction and more on the text; here for Frequently Asked Questions; here for advice to students on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more on searching here) or browse the menu categories to the right of the SFE logo. To identify contributors, whose initials appear at the end of each entry, click the Incoming button.

Planetary

Tagged: Publication | Comics

US Comic-book series by writer Warren Ellis and artist John Cassaday, published by Wildstorm Comics (which later became an imprint of DC Comics). The series ran for 27 issues and was published sporadically from April 1999 to October 2009. Three additional issues outside the main series, one of which crossed over with Batman, were also published in 2000, 2002 and 2003; two of these were drawn by other artists.The series revolves around Planetary, a team of "Archaeologists of the Impossible" seeking to unearth the hidden history of the world, and with it the life story of their enigmatic, amnesiac member/leader Elijah Snow. Along the way, Ellis explores the archetypes of pop culture, using new...

Flash Gordon

Tagged: Film | Comics | Character | Radio

1. US Comic strip created by artist Alex Raymond for King Features Syndicate. Flash Gordon appeared in 1934, at first in Sunday, later in daily newspapers. Its elaborately shaded style and exotic storyline made it one of the most influential sf strips. It was taken over in 1944 by Austin Briggs, then in 1948 by Mac Raboy, and since then has been drawn by several artists, including Dan Barry (with contributions from artists Harvey Kurtzman and Wally Wood and writer Harry Harrison), Al Williamson, Gray Morrow, and Kevin VanHook. The daily comic strip ended in 1992; new Sunday strips were produced by writer/artist Jim Keefe from 1996 through 2003, when the strip was discontinued. Various episo...

Atlas/Seaboard Comics

Tagged: Comics | Community

Seaboard Periodicals was founded in 1974 by former Marvel Comics publisher Martin Goodman and his son Charles "Chip" Goodman. Atlas was the name of the imprint used for Seaboard's Comics titles: the company is referred to as Atlas/Seaboard to avoid confusion with the 1950s Atlas Comics, the predecessor of Marvel Comics. The company attempted to publish a line of colour comics in various genres, including the Superheroes Ironjaw, Tiger-Man and The Cougar (created by Steve Mitchell). A line of black-and-white comics-format magazines was also launched, with Devilina perhaps being the most notable. This title featured fantasy-horror tales, usually starring female protagonists and sometimes stray...

Flash Gordon

Tagged: Film | Comics | Character | Radio

1. US Comic strip created by artist Alex Raymond for King Features Syndicate. Flash Gordon appeared in 1934, at first in Sunday, later in daily newspapers. Its elaborately shaded style and exotic storyline made it one of the most influential sf strips. It was taken over in 1944 by Austin Briggs, then in 1948 by Mac Raboy, and since then has been drawn by several artists, including Dan Barry (with contributions from artists Harvey Kurtzman and Wally Wood and writer Harry Harrison), Al Williamson, Gray Morrow, and Kevin VanHook. The daily comic strip ended in 1992; new Sunday strips were produced by writer/artist Jim Keefe from 1996 through 2003, when the strip was discontinued. Various episo...

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