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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Franklin, H Bruce

(1934-2024) US critic and academic, a cultural historian in various positions at Stanford University from 1961, in that year giving one of the earliest university courses in sf in the USA. In 1972, despite holding tenure, he was dismissed by Stanford for making speeches allegedly inciting students to riot against the university's involvement in the Vietnam War – a case well known to those interested in questions of academic freedom. He became full professor, again with tenure, at Rutgers ...

Hornaday, William T

(1854-1937) US naturalist and taxidermist – chief taxidermist with the Smithsonian Institution from 1882, and first director of the Bronx Zoo, beginning in 1896 – and author, in whose Lost Race tale, The Man Who Became A Savage; A Story of Our Times (1896), a jaded American flees to Borneo, where he discovers an unknown civilization of headhunters. [JC]

Hedges, Sid G

(1897-1974) UK author, mostly of detective thrillers; of interest are The Channel Tunnel Mystery (1931), which does not actually incorporate the eponymous tunnel, and the Near Future Plague Panic (1934), in which criminals seeking vast sums of blackmail threaten to infect the entire world with the eponymous bacillus, creating a deadly Pandemic. [JC]

Hahn, Charles Curtz

(1858-1938) US priest (deposed in 1884), religious poet and author whose The Wreck of the South Pole; Or, the Great Dissembler and Other Strange Tales (coll 1899) contains mainly the title novella, about a Lost Race at the South Pole with Telepathic powers and advanced technology; plans to "wrench" the pole, thus changing the world's climate, do not bear fruit. The remaining stories are fantasy. [JC]

Gerard, Louise

(1878-1970) UK author, almost exclusively of romances, some of them literally bodice-rippers, featuring heroines who are frequently abducted, bound, raped, and who then fall in love with the aristocratic perp; her first novel, The Golden Centipede (1910), features, on the other hand, a dominatrix white queen, a She figure who rules a Lost Race in the heart of darkest Africa. [JC]

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. He began to publish work of genre interest with an sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" in Triquarterly for Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959]; he began consistently publishing sf reviews in his "New Fiction" column for the Toronto Star (1966-1967), and later in ...



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