Search SFE    Search EoF

  Omit cross-reference entries  

Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 27 June 2022
Sponsor of the day: David Redd

Swift, Jonathan

(1667-1745) Irish satirist, cleric and poet, dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, from 1713, who began publishing with the relatively innocuous Ode: to the King on his Irish Expedition (1691 chap), but who soon composed A Tale of a Tub [for subtitle see Checklist] (1704) anonymous, written almost a decade before it was published. The book incorporated a second satire, usually called today "The Battle of the Books", which used the imagery of books taking sides in a Library in a pitched battle ...

Hingley, Ronald

(1920-2010) Scottish academic specializing in Russian studies, a translator from the Russian – most notably of the works of Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) in nine volumes (1974-1980) – and author. His Near Future sf novel Up Jenkins! (1956) satirically presents a UK split in two after a civil war, the northern half remaining more or less free, the southern half transformed into People's Britain, and ruled in totalitarian fashion. The Satire of People's Britain is deft, though ...

Bellamy, Edward

(1850-1898) US author and journalist, the latter from 1871, when he abandoned the practice of law before having properly begun it; no lawyers exist in the 2000 CE of his most famous work, the Utopia Looking Backward 2000-1887 (1888) and its sequel, Equality (1897), whose influence in the nineteenth century was enormous. His early works of fiction were Gothic; sentimental and labouredly influenced by Nathaniel Hawthorne, they are nevertheless strangely moving, though Miss Ludington's Sister: A ...

Agbabi, Patience

(1955-    ) UK poet and author, active from around 1995; her fourth volume of poems, Telling Tales (coll of linked poems 2014), comprises a retelling of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (late fourteenth century). She is of sf interest for her first novel, The Infinity (2020), which initiates the Young Adult Leap Cycle sequence. The young protagonist, who with some others are able to engage in Time Travel through a yet-unexplained Psi Power, lands in 2045, by which point ...

Da Cruz, Daniel

(1921-1991) US author, formerly known for numerous men's action-adventure tales, who began publishing sf with The Grotto of the Formigans (1980), a novel about African grotto Monsters, and who came to more general notice with his Ayes of Texas sequence: The Ayes of Texas (1982), Texas on the Rocks (1986) and Texas Triumphant (1987). The political premises underlying the series – in the late 1990s the USSR, having hoodwinked the supinely liberal US media, has come to dominate the world ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



x
This website uses cookies.  More information here. Accept Cookies